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You can teach anyone how to use a camera, but you can’t train them how to have a good eye. Some people just have a knack for seeing the splendour in moments the rest of us walk by. More artist than photographer, Lisa Sorgini is one of these souls. Armed with her gear, and a unique view of the world, Lisa performs magic tricks where ever she goes, taking unlikely scenes like rundown motels and old tin sheds and turning them into things of beauty. Lost & Found chatted with Lisa about rock Goddesses, crackling fires and her fear of interviews.

Tell us about where you live?
I live in a little house by the beach in a suburb called South Golden Beach in Northern NSW. I live there with my partner, my two-year-old son and two cats.

What are your favourite sounds?
The ocean from our bedroom, a bustling city, my son chatting away, and a crackling fire. Obviously not all at once.

What’s a book that’s moved you?
I adore Patti Smith and I just saw her perform the album Horses at Bluesfest recently, so I’m currently re-reading her memoir Just Kids. Her writing is so transformative and so richly visual. She’s a true poet in my mind and her dedication to making art her life’s priority is incredibly inspiring.

What’s heaven for you?
Planning travel, talking about travel and travelling. Also, cheese, a good red and a good record.

What’s the most remarkable sight you’ve seen in the world?
I’ve travelled the world, but for me, nothing has been a more incredible sight than meeting my son for the first time.

I like that my photography can often translate an expression that I’m unable to do with words.

What’s right with the world?
Art and love. There’s great art and great love happening everywhere. I find it easy to get caught up in the atrocities around the world. I often end up feeling completely heart broken and helpless with the state of things. When I’m feeling that way, it’s good to look around my local creative community, at people making positive change, and focus on that.

What do you like most about your photography?
That it can often translate an expression that I’m unable to do with words.

What’s something that gives you anxiety?
Interviews.

What’s something you wonder about?
I wonder why there are people in power who have the chance to make the world better but choose cruelty, greed and ego instead.

Do you have a favourite souvenir from your adventures?
I’m not a big souvenir buyer. Though wherever I end up in the world, be it Gundagai or Barcelona, I always make it a priority to find a secondhand market and look for a little treasure.

When was the last time you cried?
Um, last week. I’m a big crier. I think that’s my Italian family influence. I cry at the drop of a hat. Last week, it was the day before my son Ari turned two and I realised he wasn’t a baby anymore. Cue the waterworks.

For more of Lisa’s work, check out her website here or follow her on Instagram here.

Images: Proving travel photography doesn’t have to be all sunsets and palm trees, Lisa captures moments from the road that have a quiet, almost melancholic, vibe.

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